Best Beauty Supplements for Hair, Skin & Nails

Best Beauty Supplements for Hair, Skin & Nails

We all know that feeling good about oneself on the inside is essential. But, of course, looking great on the outside really goes a long way to supporting confidence, too.

A number of factors can affect skin, nails and hair including genetics, fluctuating hormones, a lack of sleep, nutrient deficiencies and a stressful lifestyle.

Top Tips to Help Maintain Your Natural Beauty

  • Increase fresh fruits, vegetables, lean protein, nuts, seeds and oily fish in your diet
  • Get plenty of fresh air but always remember to wear a hat and apply your favourite sunscreen.
  • Rest, relax and try get 7-9 hours of sleep a night. Sleep and relaxation  are important for restoring body and mind
  • Regular exercise helps to improve circulation, oxygen supply and delivery of nutrients to the body.
  • Stay hydrated – drink small sips of water frequently throughout the day

If, in addition to your daily skin care routine, you are interested in supporting beauty from within with supplementation, there are some key nutrients that you may want to consider.

Biotin

One of the simplest and easiest ways to support beautiful glowing skin and healthy locks is with biotin. Biotin is part of the B vitamin family and a water-soluble vitamin. Like all B vitamins, biotin helps convert the foods we eat into the energy we need.

Although biotin deficiency is rare it may result in thinning hair, brittle nails and a red scaly rash around the mouth and eyes.

Biotin plays a role in keratin production, which is why it’s so popular for beauty. Keratin is a structural protein in hair and nails and is found in the epidermal layer of skin. Keratin helps to smooth hair stands and helps to make nails stronger and more resilient. Keratin also helps form a protective layer on the skin surface and maintains skin integrity.

Biotin can be found in some yummy foods like avocados, salmon and nuts. Who could say “no” to these? Of course, not all of us eat as well as we should and biotin supplementation may be useful, especially because, as a water-soluble vitamin, it needs to be replenished on a daily basis.

Collagen

Collagen is the most abundant protein in the body. It gives skin and joints their strength and elasticity. As we age, our bodies are less able maintain collagen levels. Science suggest that collagen levels may drop by as much as one to two per cent every year in post-menopausal women. In addition to normal chronological ageing, bad habits and poor lifestyle choices like smoking, alcohol consumption, a high-sugar diet as well as too much time in the sun may also contribute to collagen depletion.

Eating a healthy diet rich in vitamins, minerals and cell-protecting nutrients like vitamin E, exercising and limiting sun exposure, we may be able to limit oxidative stress (free radical damage) that breaks down collagen and speeds up its loss.
Within skin, collagen forms the framework of the dermis—the thickest layer of skin. It is when collagen levels in the dermis drop that crow’s feet, fine lines and wrinkles appear.

Collagen in the dermis also helps to form a matrix into which other important molecules embed themselves—molecules like water-loving hyaluronic acid.
Studies using hydrolysed type II collagen have suggested positive benefits for skin health that include supporting skin elasticity and reducing skin wrinkling.

Vitamin C

Vitamin C is found in high amounts in both the outer and middle layer of skin, but as we age the levels of vitamin C in skin tends to decline. In order to make collagen we need an adequate intake of vitamin C because collagen formation is dependent on vitamin C. 

Zinc

Zinc is needed to produce and keratinocytes. Keratinocytes are skin cells and produce keratin. Keratin gives skin its flexibility and strength.

Zinc also helps protect skin against oxidative stress. Oxidative stress is known to accelerate skin ageing and may contribute to wrinkles due to damage to collagen. When zinc levels are low, skin blemishes and rough skin are common and white patches may appear on nails.

Vitamin E

Skin is particularly vulnerable to the elements and protection of skin against oxidative stress caused by UV exposure from the sun and pollution is important. Vitamin E is a collective name for a group of fat-soluble vitamins that help protect the body against oxidative stress caused by free radicals.

Pycnogenol®

Pycnogenol® is a natural plant extract originating from the bark of the maritime pine (Pinus pinaster) that grows along the coast of southwest France. It is a source of proanthocyanidins. Research has shown that Pycnogenol® may help to support skin hydration, increase skin elasticity, and reinforce skin barrier function for those individuals exposed to urban environmental pollution, as well as seasonal temperature and humidity variations.

Omega-3 and Omega-6

Omega-3 and omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids are important for skin appearance and function. As we cannot make our own omega-3 and omega-6 these important essential fatty acids must be obtained from the foods we eat. Oily fish like salmon, sardines and mackerel are good sources of omega-3 and nuts and seeds are a great way to obtain omega-6. If you’re not fond of fish or struggle to eat the recommended 2 x 140 gram portions a week, then fish oil supplements may be an option for you.

Astaxanthin

Astaxanthin is a carotenoid that occurs naturally in some algae, including Haematococcus Pluvialis. It is responsible for the flamboyant pink colour in marine animals like salmon, lobster, shrimps and even flamingoes. Research suggests that Astaxanthin supplementation may improve skin elasticity and reduce the appearance of fine lines.

Hyaluronic Acid

Hyaluronic acid is a water-loving molecule found in the skin and can hold onto 1000 times its weight in water, helping to keep skin plumped-up.
Younger skin is rich in hyaluronic acid, but by the age of 30 it begins to diminish and this continues with advancing age. This decline in hyaluronic acid is thought to be a contributing factor for dryness and wrinkling that is characteristic of ageing skin.

Solgar® has a variety of supplements that support beauty from within including:

Solgar® Collagen Hyaluronic Acid Complex

Solgar Collagen Hyaluronic Acid Complex

Designed to complement a healthy and varied diet, this advanced formulation is designed to support soft, plump and supple skin and nourish skin from within.
The key ingredient within this complex is BioCell Collagen™. BioCell Collagen contains a patented composition of naturally occurring Hydrolysed Collagen Type II, Chondroitin Sulphate and Hyaluronic Acid and is highly absorbable.

In a 12-week study in 113 women BioCell Collagen supplementation at 1 gram a day was shown to reduce the appearance of fine lines and wrinkles and increase skin collagen content and elasticity.

Solgar® Skin, Nails and Hair Formula

Solgar Skin, Nails and Hair Formula

Skin Nails and Hair Formula is the perfect daily vegan-friendly beauty support formula, containing zinc, copper, MSM, silica (from red algae), amino acids and vitamin C to support collagen formation. This formulation is designed to help build collagen with vitamin C. Contains essential beauty nutrients including zinc, copper and vitamin C and protects against oxidative stress with zinc and vitamin C.

Solgar® Biotin 5000 mcg

Biotin is a water-soluble B-vitamin and has several important functions in the body including energy metabolism and supporting healthy skin and hair.

  • One of the highest strength Biotin formulas available
  • Biotin supports healthy hair and skin
  • Biotin supports energy and vitality

Solgar® Vitamin C Plus Rose Hips 1000 mg

Vitamin C 1000 mg with Rose Hips is a high dose vitamin C supplement suitable for vegans.

  • Vitamin C contributes to a healthy immune system and supports energy
  • Vitamin C supports collagen formation supporting blood vessels, bones, teeth, gums and skin
  • Vitamin C protects against oxidative stress
  • Complexed with Rose Hip powder. Rose hips are rose plant fruit and naturally store vitamin C and bioflavonoids.


We also have other popular supplements including:

Solgar® Pycnogenol® 100 mg

Pycnogenol is a natural plant extract originating from the bark of the maritime pine (Pinus pinaster). It contains a combination of Proanthocyanidins, bioflavonoids and phenolic acids.

  • Provides a concentrated source of Proanthocyanidins
  • 100 mg of trademarked and patented Pycnogenol® (French Maritime Pine Bark extract)
  • Backed by over 40 years of research
  • Suitable for vegans

Solgar® Full Spectrum™ Omega Wild Alaskan Salmon Oil

Full Spectrum™ Omega Wild Alaskan Salmon Oil softgels are carefully manufactured from Wild Alaskan Salmon sustainably caught in the pristine, cold waters of Alaska. Wild Alaskan salmon is also one of the richest sources of EPA and DHA—the omega-3 fatty acids that most people consume too little of, and this makes salmon uniquely healthful.

  • Full spectrum of omegas – 3,5,6, 7 and 9 – as natural triglycerides
  • Omega-3 supports vision, heart and brain health
  • Naturally occurring vitamin D3 supports immune system function
  • Contains the carotenoid Astaxanthin
  • Proprietary purification process to ensure removal of heavy metals including mercury, PCBs and other environmental contaminants

Solgar® Liquid Vitamin E

Liquid Vitamin E is ideal for both internal consumption and topical use. Vitamin E supports protection of cells from oxidative stress caused by free radicals. Natural source vitamin E (d-alpha tocopherol) is shown to be up to 1.3 time more bioavailable than synthetic vitamin E forms.

  • Vitamin E as D-alpha tocopherol (natural source)
  • 150 IU vitamin E in a safflower and vegetable oil base
  • Plus mixed tocopherols (D-beta, D-gamma, D-delta and D-alpha tocopherols)
  • Vitamin E contributes to the protection of cells from oxidative stress32
  • For both internal and topical use
  • Vegan

Solgar® Astaxanthin 5 mg

Astaxanthin is a carotenoid that occurs naturally in some algae, including Haematococcus pluvialis. It is responsible for the flamboyant pink colour in marine animals like salmon, lobster, shrimps and even flamingoes.

  • 5 mg of Astaxanthin per serving
  • Sourced from Haematococcus pluvialis
  • A natural xanthophyll carotenoid
  • Gluten, wheat, dairy, soya and yeast free


Disclaimer:
Food supplements do not replace a healthy and varied diet and exercise.




References:
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